Rilke writes a letter

“If your everyday life seems poor, don’t blame it; blame yourself; admit to yourself that you are not enough of a poet to call forth its riches”
 

 

 

— Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters To A Young Poet, Letter 1

 

 

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10 comments
  1. Anonymous said:

    Beautiful line. Thanks for sharing unawoken. Bookmarked the letter for later.

    ~ps-ps-i

  2. Unawoken said:

    Thanks ps-ps-i. I really liked the line

  3. Tiny Seal said:

    Third paragraph onwards are great words of advice. Like he said, this guidance can be applied to not just poetry, but pretty much any path one wants to take in life.

    Look forward to reading the rest of the letters.

  4. Unawoken said:

    Tiny Seal,
    I agree. I read the original line itself as a generic piece of advice.
    In yet another way of seeing it, we are all poets, and our poetry is as rich as we allow ourselves to see.

  5. Justuju said:

    Thanks Unawoken. I find your posts very interesting and thought provoking. Whether it's your own writing or these gems you dig out from god knows where, I'm glad you share them on this blog.

  6. Unawoken said:

    Thanks Justuju! I am glad you enjoy my posts!
    Over here, of course, Rilke takes the cake, I just get a piece of the frosting 🙂

  7. ‎”Good writing can be defined as having something to say and saying it well. When one has nothing to say, one should remain silent. Silence is always beautiful at such times.” — Edward Abbey

  8. unawoken said:

    “No one can write a best seller by trying to. He must write with complete sincerity; the clichés that make you laugh, the hackneyed characters, the well-worn situations, the commonplace story that excites your derision, seem neither hackneyed, well worn nor commonplace to him. The conclusion is obvious: you cannot write anything that will convince unless you are yourself convinced. The best seller sells because he writes with his heart’s blood.”
    –W. Somerset Maugham

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